More Immigrants And Fewer Jobs To Come For Canada 

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If the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship John McCallum gets his way with this, Canada will significantly boost immigration far beyond its current registration level to fulfill this nation’s need of workforce.On a recent visit to Manila, Philippines, Minister McCallum pointed out a remarkable aging among Canadian population and the imminent workforce scarcity that the country has to face, during a speech in front of Canada’s Chamber of Commerce in Philippines.

“Why not substantially increase the number of immigrants coming to Canada? And that is, I think, I hope, what we are about to do… the direction in which I would like to go is to increase substantially the number of immigrants”, said McCallum according to a transcript of his speech, obtained by the CBC/Radio-Canada public broadcasting service. “We’re going to reduce some of the barriers in our immigration system… we think it can’t be simplified.” “We think there are some rules which are no longer necessary,” McCallum added.

Trudeau’s Government is working on the admission of new immigrants, between 280,000 and 305,000 new permanent residents in 2016 – a record increase from the number (from 260,000 to 285,000) the previous Conservative Government had planned to welcome at the end of the year 2015.

The key of this planning of the Liberal Government is to promote innovation and the growth of the economy; this can be found in McCallum’s three year Immigration Plan, which will be made known this fall.

McCallum announced that any final, definitive decision has been made so far and that he has to incorporate his Cabinet colleagues to his new plan and convince Canadians that this is what needs to be done.

“Now, we have to convince Canadians of this. But I think it’s a good idea”, he stated. However, Globe and Mail/Nanos’ survey “Opinions of Canadians on immigration and temporary foreign workers” revealed that only a 16% of Canadians think their country should accept the same or more immigrants, while a 76% of them oppose to this with an opinion that the same or fewer immigrants should be accepted in Canada next year.

Now, how would that affect McCallum’s plans?