Saskatchewan Wants to Deliver Healthcare Services on its Own Terms

in Canada by

WARNING: ⚠️ DEBATE POST is shutting down very soon thanks to Facebook and Twitter banning us along with our 400,000 followers, you can follow on alternatives like frontpagelink.com where the radical left doesn't moderate content. 

The Saskatchewan government always plays by its own rules.

Same was the case when it came to accepting federal financing programs for the province’s healthcare service delivery. The federal government and the Conservatives in Saskatchewan held differences about financing home care and mental health.

But it seems that both governments have reached some sort of compromise and agreement on the receiving and distribution of funds. After months of discussion and back and forth, the Saskatchewan government has reached a deal with the federal government to receive healthcare funds. It seems the Saskatchewan government doesn’t want to compromise on the quality of healthcare service delivery to the people.

The agreement details

According to the deal reached between the federal and the provincial governments, Saskatchewan will acquire a total of $190.3 million against home care and $158.5 million against mental health services in the upcoming decade.

Both governments have also reached another, separate agreement on private MRI clinics. One of the major reasons for a dispute between the two governments was that the Conservative government didn’t believe having private MRIs will hurt the public health care system in any way. Under the recent deal, Saskatchewan will receive a year’s reprieve on private MRIs.

The cabinet weighs in

Even though the Saskatchewan government is not fully satisfied with the deal, they are happy with the progress they made. “We think that we’re in a situation right now where frankly, because of money we need in areas that are a priority for the federal government as well, such as mental health and home care, we think it’s very important now to just get started,” the province’s Health Minister Jim Reiter told the media.

The agreement, however, only covers about 20 percent of the province’s health spending. Premier Brad Wall and his cabinet still need to cover the bulk of the province’s healthcare out of their own pocket.