July 28, 2021

Carlos Cuevas, the Spanish heartthrob who goes from Merlí’s modern philosophy to the music of the ’60s

He was the beloved student of Merlin and went to college to become philosopher in the sequel Know Aude. Now we can also see Carlos Cuevas as Rober, a singer from the sixties in 45 Revolutions, series that these days can be seen by Atreseries and is also available on Flow and Netflix.

In Spain, almost everyone knows him because he has worked from a very young age. But here and in the rest of the world it was, is – and will it be? – Pol Rubio, that character who made him a massive star in the history of the Catalan professor who embodied so well Francesc Orella for three seasons.

Rebellious, provocative and sexually outspoken, Rubio became a television referent of the working class and the LGTB collective. Thanks to him, Cuevas entered the category of “gallants”, and it is today one of the most coveted faces of streaming.

Carlos Cuevas on his last visit to Buenos Aires. (Photo Lucia Merle)

“I am proud, motivated, everything is very positive. I am living a good professional moment, so you have to take advantage of it with your head, because in this job you can be on top of the wave or that the wave itself will drag you down”, He reflected a while ago in an interview with the Spanish newspaper ABC.

In the Merlin original He was the student who got the most juice from the teacher. Hence, he was the one indicated to interpret the university student who decides on Philosophy in Know Aude.

“I have a lot of affection for this series for everything it has given me. Pol’s character has grown and matured in the same way as me as an individual, ”Cuevas said about the series spin-off whose second season premiered in April of this year.

Just a few months before filming the sequel to Merlin, Cuevas faced another leading role in 45 Revolutions, the musical drama from the creators of Grand Hotel, Velvet Y The Cable Girls. There he is a young singer who falls in love with Maribel (Guiomar Puerta), a different artist who is taking her first steps in the music industry of the 1960s.

To prepare that character, The Catalan actor said that he saw several biopics about iconic singers, among them, the great work of Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash on Johnny and June: Passion and Madness.

On "45 revolutions"Cuevas is Rober, a rebellious musician from the 1960s.

In “45 revolutions”, Cuevas is Rober, a rebellious musician from the 1960s.

The child actor who started in advertising

Carlos Cuevas Sisó was born 25 years ago in Barcelona. He started out as an advertising actor at the age of five. At seven he made his film debut, in the movie The ice woman.

From the age of eight, he ventured as a dubbing actor for films and for television and radio advertising campaigns. A year later he made his debut on the small screen, in an episode of Trilita, TV3 series.

His first big role came in 2005, with only nine years, in the series Ventdelplà from TV3. The Catalan public fell in love with Biel Delmàs, the boy who carried on for 330 episodes and seven seasons in that series that ended in 2010.

In the "Merlin" original was the favorite student of the philosophy teacher played by Francesc Orella.

In the original “Merlí” he was the favorite student of the philosophy teacher played by Francesc Orella.

“I was always very hard-working and constant. As a boy he said he wanted to act. I was a child actor ”, he said in his last interview with Clarion.

Before stepping into the shoes of Pol Rubio, Cuevas worked in the last seasons of Tell me how it happened, the successful and long-running Spanish series starring Imanol Arias, that tells the history of the country and that here it had its local version. There he played Marcos, Inés’s boyfriend, one of the main characters.

Last year, Cuevas joined the series Leonardo, an Italian, French, Spanish and German co-production that addresses the life and work of Leonardo Da Vinci. In his first English-speaking production, he played Salai, a painter who was a disciple of the creator of La Gioconda.

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